Topic: workplace discrimination

Workplace Issues: Latest Need-to-Know Employment Law News

Employee social media use, overtime laws, worker classification rules, workplace discrimination, union bargaining, confidentiality, H1-B visas, noncompetes, and employee handbooks … but a few of the issues in this latest roundup of commentary and analysis from labor and employment attorneys on JD Supra. For your reference: The NLRB’s Year In Numbers: FY 2012 (Franczek Radelet… Read more »

Commissioner @ChaiFeldblum Offers Her Perspective on the EEOC’s Strategic Enforcement Plan

From the Corporate Law Report, the first of what we hope will be many insightful pieces on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and US labor law from Chai Feldblum, EEOC Commissioner and former Georgetown Law professor: “The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enters the New Year with the wind at its back. Following the enactment… Read more »

3 Cheers for Holiday Parties! 5 Rules for Limiting Employer Liability!

Throwing a company holiday party? You’ll want to establish some ground rules. Of course, we have our own such “guidelines” – gleaned from years of experience – for making sure things don’t get out of hand: clear out the mistletoe. Lock up the supply closets. Unplug the self-tweeting Xerox machine. Don’t let that tall guy… Read more »

Workplace Discrimination: Latest Need-to-Know from JD Supra

We welcome one of our newest JD Supra contributors — the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — with a roundup of recent updates on workplace discrimination and related legal issues. For your reference: ATK to Pay $100,000 to Settle EEOC Race Discrimination Case (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission): “Alliant Techsystems, Inc. (ATK), a Minnesota-based company that… Read more »

EEOC to Employers: Anti-Discrimination Also Laws Protect Domestic Violence Victims

Earlier this month, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission released new guidance to help employers avoid discrimination of domestic violence victims. Entitled “Questions and Answers: The Application of Title VII and the Americans with Disabilities Act to Applicants or Employees who Experience Domestic or Dating Violence, Sexual Assault or Stalking,” the guidance provides examples of employment… Read more »

Filling a Vacancy? Your Best Candidate Might Be Less Qualified, Says Court

“Federal and state governments, and the plaintiff’s bar, have laid down a dangerous maze that every employer has to traverse to hire and retain employees in hopes of achieving success… In interviewing, hiring, employing, paying and severing an employee, there is a minefield employers need to negotiate. Things like Title VII, ADA, ADEA, FCRA, EPA,… Read more »

Workplace Discrimination Lawsuits: A Look Into The Future

Employers take note: the landscape of employee discrimination litigation is changing. That’s the message of a recent update from law firm Spilman Thomas & Battle: “For employment lawyers, the elements of an employment discrimination lawsuit are second nature: a plaintiff must belong to a protected class, the employer must make an adverse employment decision, and… Read more »

Transgender Employees Protected Against Workplace Discrimination, EEOC Rules

In a recent decision, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ruled that the Civil Rights Act protects transgendered employees from discrimination in the workplace. In its ruling, the EEOC said that Mia Macy, a transgendered woman, could proceed with a charge of gender identity discrimination against the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Macy claims… Read more »

EEOC to Employers: Don’t Use Criminal Records as a Basis for Discrimination

On April 25, 2012, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission updated its policies on the use of arrest and conviction records when making employment decisions. The updated policy is intended to provide employers with best practices for avoiding discrimination based on race or national origin when evaluating the criminal history of current and potential employees. For… Read more »

Who is Liable? Workplace Discrimination, Cat’s Paw Theory, and SCOTUS

“On March 1, 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court held that an employer may be liable for the discriminatory motives of a supervisor who influences but does not make the ultimate employment decision. The Court’s ruling will impact employment discrimination claims where multiple individuals are claimed to have made, caused, or influenced the ultimate employment decision…”… Read more »