Topic: Discrimination in the Workplace

Supreme Court Says Separation of Church and State Applies to Hiring Decisions – Confirms “Ministerial Exception”

Are religious institutions (i.e., churches) free to dismiss ministers without regard to federal employment discrimination laws? On January 11, 2012, a unanimous Supreme Court answered that question with a resounding “yes:” “… the Courts of Appeals have uniformly recognized the existence of a ‘ministerial exception,’ grounded in the First Amendment, that precludes application of [employment… Read more »

Workplace Discrimination Includes “Retaliation” – 5 Ways to Recognize & Avoid It

“More and more employers are recognizing what employment attorneys have long known. The most prevalent type of employment discrimination claim is not one based on race, sex, religion, disability or age. Rather, it is one alleging unlawful retaliation. In fact, in 2010, for the first time ever, retaliation claims surpassed race discrimination claims to become… Read more »

Transgender Equal Rights Bill Passed in Massachusetts

“On November 23, 2011, [Massachusetts] Governor Patrick signed into law House Bill 3810, ‘An Act Relative To Gender Identity.’ The new law protects transgender individuals from discrimination in housing, education, employment and credit by adding ‘gender identity’ to the list of classes protected by various Massachusetts non-discrimination and hate crime statutes.” (Massachusetts Enacts Transgender Equal… Read more »

Employee Handbooks: 7 Tips to Getting Yours Done

“Every employee receives the same information about the rules of the workplace; employees know what is expected from them and what they can expect from the business. Having an employee handbook also may get offer legal protection if an employee later files an employment claim against the business…” Culled from lawyers and law firms writing… Read more »

Okay For Employees to Steal Trade Secrets? Apparently Yes, Sometimes It Is

Here’s an interesting employment update from law firm Fisher & Phillips to do with a case (Joyce Quinlan v. Curtiss-Wright Corporation) in which the New Jersey Supreme Court “addressed the question of whether an employee may take confidential documents from his or her employer for the purpose of helping in the prosecution of a discrimination… Read more »